TECHNOREALISM: A KNOW-NOTHING PARTY FOR THE ‘90S

“I don’t know. I’m not a legislator.”

Brooke Shelby Biggs, freelance new media hack and one of the 12 original signatories of the Technorealist Manifesto, showing deep insight on “Technorealism Applied” by answering the question “how should we think about technology?” in the negative, Harvard Law School, 19 March 1998

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LIBERTE, EGALITE, EMPLOYEE …

“It will be an optimistic speech, about imagination, progress, and new jobs.”

Xavier Schallenbaum, webmaster of French President Jacques Chirac’s vanity Web site, on his boss’s upcoming oration on the French people’s embrace of the Internet

... LIBERTE, EGALITE, TECHNOREALITE

“The Internet has been both magnified and vilified. We’ll try to avoid both the paranoic critics and the optimistic hype and address the issue through facts.”

France Miremont, organizer of a mock trial of “the Internet” to be held in Paris’s Court of Justice; the defendant will be represented by a young women dressed in “cyberclothes,” natch, New York Times CyberTimes, 17 March 1998

GOOD FIREWALLS MAKE GOOD NEIGHBORS

“Because I’m technologically able to find a likeminded person on the other side of the globe, I’m also more interested in making friends with my next-door neighbor.”

Jeffrey Klein, hellraiser-in-chief of Mother Jones magazine, coming down on the side of optimistic engagement with people who live in your same ZIP code and share your demographic, Mother Jones, March/April 1998

THE WEB IS A GLOBAL, DISTRIBUTED, REDUNDANT SOLUTIONS PROVIDER

“I say that solutions come not just from the market, or the government but from individual action, and the Web gives you much more of a way to do that.”

Esther Dyson, queen of the Technorealists, which surprisingly is not a retro-disco band, but an assemblage of pundits who think that — news flash! — this technology thing might be overhyped, The New York Times, 12 March 1998

ANYTHING ELSE YOU’D LIKE TO DISCLAIM WHILE YOU’RE AT IT?

“Andy Grove could stride down his company’s halls, bellowing ‘Make me a pyramid from the bones of my enemies!’ and have half a chance of tripping over it by sunset. (Intel is an investor in CNET: The Computer Network.)”

Michael Kanellos, a senior writer at Intel-funded CNET and someone who clearly knows who puts the butter on his bread, News.com, 5 March 1998